Tuesday, August 25, 2009

Seth Godin and Theological Education at the Crossroads

When author and marketing expert Seth Godin speaks at conferences there’s always a packed house.

When he posts articles to his blog every day, 44,000 people around the world stop what they are doing to read Seth’s Blog. It’s ranked in the top 150 blogs and the #1 marketing blog in the world. Seth also started last year a new 6 month MBA program.

Earlier this month (August 2009) he wrote the following article entitled ‘Education at the Crossroads’. The prophetic nature of it got me thinking about ‘Theological Education at the Crossroads.

Actually, there isn't one, there are three choices that anyone offering higher education is going to have to make.

Should this be scarce or abundant?
MIT and Stanford are starting to make classes available for free online. The marginal cost of this is pretty close to zero, so it's easy for them to share. Abundant education is easy to access and offers motivated individuals a chance to learn.

Scarcity comes from things like accreditation, admissions policies or small classrooms.

Should this be free or expensive?
Wikipedia offers the world's fact base to everyone, for free. So it spreads.

On the other hand, some bar review courses are so expensive the websites don't even have the guts to list the price.

The newly easy access to the education marketplace (you used to need a big campus and a spot in the guidance office) means that both the free and expensive options are going to be experimented with, because the number of people in the education business is going to explode (then implode).

If you think the fallout in the newspaper business was dramatic, wait until you see what happens to education.

Should this be about school or about learning?
School was the big thing for a long time. School is tests and credits and notetaking and meeting standards. Learning, on the other hand, is 'getting it'. It's the conceptual breakthrough that permits the student to understand it then move on to something else. Learning doesn't care about workbooks or long checklists.

For a while, smart people thought that school was organized to encourage learning. For a long time, though, people in the know have realized that they are fundamentally different activities.

The combinations...
Imagine a school that's built around free, abundant learning. And compare it to one that's focused on scarce, expensive schooling. Or dream up your own combination. My recent MBA program, for example, was scarce (only 9 people got to do it) and it was free and focused on learning.

Just because something is free doesn't meant there isn't money to be made. Someone could charge, for example, for custom curricula, or focused tutoring, or for a certified (scarce) degree. When a million people are taking your course, you only need 1% to pay you to be happy indeed.

Eight combinations of the three choices are available and my guess is that all eight will be tried. If I were going to wager, I'd say that the free, abundant learning combination is the one that's going to change the world.

Link
Seth Godin, Education at the Crossroads, Seth Godin’s Blog, August 2009.

Subscribe! It’s free!

Related
Seth Godin Tells Teachers: Quit Textbooks and Publish Free Online, Seth’s Blog, 14 June 2009.

For First Time Readers of TWB or a Refresher
A general introduction to Theologians Without Borders is offered in several languages at these links:
Theologians Without Borders
Teólogos Sin Fronteras
Théologiens Sans Frontières
Theologen Ohne Grenzen
Ahli Teologi Tanpa Sempadan
Ang mga Dalubhasa sa Salita ng Diyos na Walang Hangganan
Teólogos Sem Fronteiras
Teologi Senza Frontiere

If you can translate this statement into your language I would be keen to add it to this list.

Interested in Serving With TWB?
A good place to start (without making a commitment) is to adapt this Expression of Interest and send your information with a digital photo to me.

Dr Geoff Pound
Coordinator, Theologians Without Borders

Contact me on email at geoffpound[at]gmail.com or on Facebook or Twitter.

Image: Seth Godin.

Sunday, August 23, 2009

Will Theological Texts Soon Be a Thing of the Past?

This recent article by Carmel Egan contains predictions that school text books will soon be a thing of the past and it raises questions about theological texts and seminary libraries.

There are copyrighting challenges, technology obstacles and traditional preferences for hard copies but in countries around the world where books are expensive to buy and shipping costs are over the top, will e-books win the day? What do you think?

HEAVY book-filled school bags could soon be a thing of the past, with the e-book industry claiming most of students' textbooks will be contained in light hand-held portable devices within three years.

The internet-linked reading devices will store hundreds of e-textbooks bought online or borrowed from school libraries.

''E-textbooks will be mainstream within three years,'' the executive director of DA Direct, Australia's largest distributor of portable reading devices and e-books, Richard Siegersma, predicted.

Mr Siegersma said digital technology would lead to the costs of e-textbooks falling in a year to 18 months.

''There will be just-in-time and customised delivery to flexible, full-colour screens; textbooks with audio and video components; touch screens for handwriting and margin note-taking and text highlighting,'' he said.

Speaking at a conference of school librarians in Melbourne last week, Mr Siegersma told them to prepare for the transition from print to e-readers, e-books and e-textbooks.

While book lovers in the US can already access thousands of digital titles via Amazon's Kindle e-reader, users of the new technology complain they can be slow to upload, screens are black and white, page-turning is slow and titles are limited to certain publishers.

Mr Siegersma said technological breakthroughs, such as flexible, full-colour screens along with improved digital management and delivery systems, will revolutionise the way students access information.

Pressure from educational institutions, public libraries and government will also force print book publishers to address pent-up demand for more titles to be made available online.

The acting head of cultural studies at Macquarie University and author of The Book Is Dead, Long Live the Book, Sherman Young, agrees.

''The world is at the e-book tipping point and librarians will be the vanguard of the introduction of e-textbooks,'' Dr Young told the conference, organised by Curriculum Corporation and the School Library Association of Victoria.

''Book culture is still confused with print culture and it is really only this year people have started to get e-books.''

In 2005, Macquarie University library bought 16,651 books in print form, rising to 16,764 in 2007.

By comparison, the number of e-books bought rose from 896 in 2005 to 68,719 in 2007.

However, many obstacles stand between e-textbooks and classroom domination, according to Australian Copyright Council lawyer Sneha Balakrishnan.

''Some schools are already in the process of negotiating licences tailored to their needs,'' Ms Balakrishnan said.

''But there are still lots of issues to be worked through.''

Several Melbourne secondary schools have trialled e-books with students and staff in the past year with mixed results.

At the selective boys' secondary Melbourne High School, students were not persuaded by the new technology.

While enjoying e-book mobility and easy access to multiple titles, they complained of slow data uploading, slow page-turning and too few titles available free.

Wesley College's head of library and information services, Wilma Kurvink, trialled 18 e-readers with staff and students.

''Digital rights management restrictions at the point of sale have been developed for individuals on personal computers with credit cards, but publishers have not yet envisaged libraries as part of the mode or thought of building a lending system,'' Ms Kurvink said.

''School libraries have used very traditional acquisition models but that will not work with this new technology and we need to start forming collaborative groups to work with publishers in partnership.''

Link
Carmel Egan, Students to Dump Textbooks for e-books, The Age, 16 August 2009.

For First Time Readers of TWB or a Refresher
A general introduction to Theologians Without Borders is offered in several languages at these links:
Theologians Without Borders
Teólogos Sin Fronteras
Théologiens Sans Frontières
Theologen Ohne Grenzen
Ahli Teologi Tanpa Sempadan
Ang mga Dalubhasa sa Salita ng Diyos na Walang Hangganan
Teólogos Sem Fronteiras
Teologi Senza Frontiere

If you can translate this statement into your language I would be keen to add it to this list.

Interested in Serving With TWB?
A good place to start (without making a commitment) is to adapt this Expression of Interest and send your information with a digital photo to me.

Dr Geoff Pound
Coordinator, Theologians Without Borders
Contact me on email at geoffpound[@]gmail.com or on Facebook or Twitter.

Image: “Will e-books win the day?”

Saturday, August 22, 2009

The Future of Theological Education in Euro-Asia

Fascinating report just come in about the future of theological education in Russia and beyond.

Shrinkage – Necessary but Unhealthy
Moscow/Odessa -- A US-American active in Russia reports that the Southern Baptist Convention needs only five seminaries to support the ministry of its 16 million members. The countries of the former Soviet Union, which today may have as many as three million evangelical believers, host roughly 150 seminaries and Bible schools.

In an interview in Odessa this summer, Dr. Sergey Viktorovich Sannikov (Odessa), Executive Director and founding father of the “Euro-Asian Accreditating Association” (E-AAA), responded: “It’s very clear the number of theological schools will and must decrease. But it would be incorrect to label this process as one of ‘healthy shrinkage’.” Too many careers and patterns of foreign support are on the line – the process can therefore only be a painful one. “There was no strategic plan when these schools were founded – they were spontaneous creations. People were enthusiastic, Western support was available, and so they began.”

Sannikov added that the E-AAA is doing what it can to soften the blows. Extensive discussions on the Internet between leading educators are taking place. “We are encouraging schools to develop their own unique programmes or to merge with other ones. Each institute will need to have its own, distinctive face; each will need to find its own niche.” Diversification is needed – especially when a geographical advantage is not evident.

“Moscow Theological Seminary”, the flagship of the “Russian Union of Evangelical Christians-Baptists”, is one of the institutes actively involved in gathering branch institutes under its umbrella. Sannikov stated: “I think this is a very good development, especially in Russia. The government and economic conditions are putting pressure on smaller schools. Smaller institutions recognise they can work more effectively if they use the teachers and programs of a larger institution. Structural problems are being corrected: Larger institutions can much more effectively organise libraries and other resources and transfer them elsewhere.”

E-AAA’s head, a Ukrainian Baptist, also believes that, at least for the next several decades, the number of interdenominational educational institutions will not grow significantly. “Denominationalism is increasing rapidly,” he warned, “except among some of our youth. It is very difficult to somehow renounce one’s own denomination if one believes it to represent the sole truth.” Even tiny denominations such as the Wesleyans – not a part of the Methodists or Nazarenes – have their own school in Moscow. Moscow’s “Spiritual Academy of the Apostle Paul” also represents a very small constituency. A second, small “Moscow Theological Seminary” headed by Gennady Sergienko closed several months ago. One such interdenominational school is “Moscow Evangelical Christian Seminary” (See press release 09-14 from 28.4.2009).

In a few instances, expansion is still occurring. This is especially true for the Neo-Charismatic movement, which, despite very large number of “students” in congregations, is only now beginning to develop institutes capable of seminary-level training. Citing its geographical advantage, Greater-Europe-Mission-sponsored “Zaporozhye Bible College” just north of Crimea is involved in a major building programme.

Fifty-five of the roughly 150 institutes in the former Soviet Union are members of the E-AAA: 28 of these are in Ukraine, another 15 in Russia (seven in Moscow). One member each is found in Belarus, Moldova, Armenia and Lithuania. The Baptist seminary in Akademgorodok near Novosibirsk and a Baptist school for expository preaching in Samara/Volga are not members. Five to six years ago, the E-AAA listed a total enrolment of 7.000 among its members. Sannikov is unsure as to whether that number has since decreased. Counting enrolment has always been problematic: A Ukrainian school and E-AAA-member which has been teaching by extension for ex. has claimed an enrolment of 5.000. And how long are students to be considered enrolled if they have begun a programme without completing it? Consequently, the E-AAA has recently developed criteria for counting enrolment, hoping it will better reflect the true nature of an institution’s work.

In Central Asia, Tashkent/Uzbekistan has an officially-registered Baptist school; a second one allied primarily with Pentecostal and Charismatic circles is active in Almaty/Kazakhstan. Ukrainian institutions are involved in aiding several unregistered schools in the Central Asian republics. None of these have been accredited by the E-AAA. In addition, not a few future Central Asian pastors come to Russia or Ukraine for theological training.

The E-AAA, which was officially founded in 1997, includes Pentecostal, Lutheran, Presbyterian, Baptist and interdenominational schools – Adventist ones are lacking. Though several institutes are located elsewhere, the E-AAA regards itself responsible for Russian-language schools within the area of the former Soviet Union. Director Sannikov is keen to point out that the E-AAA did not develop its criteria for granting accreditation – it is not a state-recognised accreditation - on its own. It is the youngest regional member of the “International Council for Evangelical Theological Education” (ICETE). Founded with the support of the World Evangelical Association in 1980, the ICETE’s seven regional divisions now cover the globe.

The work of the E-AAA is funded by its 55 members. Regular dues are paid; an additional fee is charged for every student enrolled in an accredited programme. Expenses for the visits of E-AAA-delegations to its member schools are also paid by the host. Sannikov points out that the E-AAA does not restrict itself to issues of accreditation. Its research wing, headed by Taras Dyatlik (Rivne/West Ukraine), publishes a paper journal and books as CDs, gathers historical documents and promotes manuals on leadership. It holds conferences and training seminars for teachers; the results of which are often published. One recent project focused on the effectiveness of theological training in Euro-Asia. This research centre is not funded by the member schools – it receives grants from interested foreign agencies and foundations.

Beginnings in Odessa
Dr. Sergey Sannikov has a long history of involvement in Russian and Ukrainian theological education. When the Soviet-era “All-Union Council of Evangelical Christians-Baptists” opened its first seminary for on-location study in January 1991, Sannikov was its rector. But quarters in Moscow’s historic “First Baptist Church” were extremely cramped and a library was virtually non-existent. As a result, the decision was made after one session to transfer to Odessa, where a regional Bible school founded in 1989 had sufficient room. In two years, after the logistic issues were solved, the seminary was to return to Moscow.

Yet the liquidation of the Soviet Union in December 1991 and the splitting up of the “All-Union Council” shortly thereafter created a completely new setting. Initially Odessa remained the seminary of the new Ukrainian Union; a second seminary was opened in Moscow in 1993. The focal centre of Ukrainian seminary training is now located at Irpen just west of Kiev.

For political reasons, Sannikov believes it wise that the old Baptist Union was divided. It was not politically expedient to answer to Union headquarters located in a foreign country. “We do not need organisational unity to express the unity we feel in Christ,” he explained. “I do not suffer because of our separation.” But he admitted that spiritual costs are involved: “There is a certain nationalist movement in our congregations, and it has a negative influence on the life of the church and our relations with one another. One group stresses the Russian, another, the Ukrainian. I cannot say that one side is guiltier than the other, but every congregation has people who place too much stress on issues of nationality.”

But the E-AAA-Director believes Ukraine will remain a bridge between East and West for the foreseeable future. “Ukraine will not be pressing as hard as Georgia to enter the European Union. We are not Russian – we have a different mentality. We played a role in the middle between the 16th and 18th centuries. Perhaps we will always be in the middle – neither Europe nor Asia. But that is really quite OK!”

The address of the E-AAA’s Russian-language website

William Yoder, Ph.D.
Department for External Church Relations, RUECB
Moscow, 22 August 2009
baptistrelations@yandex.ru
www.baptistrelations.org” and “www.baptist.org.ru
Tel/fax: 007-495-954-9231

A release of the Department for External Church Relations of the Russian Union of Evangelical Christians-Baptists. It is informational in character and does not express a sole, official position of RUECB-leadership.

Image: Moscow Theological Seminary

Friday, August 21, 2009

Hermeneutics or Synoptics Teacher Requested by Sri Lanka

Teacher Required
A seminary in Sri Lanka has had a cancellation by a teacher of a course promised to students and is urgently needing a replacement for its MA programme in November 2009.

Subjects
If you could teach a course in Hermeneutics at a Masters level that would be terrific.

Another possibility for them could be to delay the offering of the hermeneutics course and offer a Synoptic Gospel course if anyone is free to assist.

Timing
The course is scheduled to be taught over 10 days.

Preferred dates are 13-21 November 2009. There is some flexibility. A week earlier could be a goer but not a week later.

Next Step
Please let me know if you are qualified and interested in undertaking this Sri Lankan assignment and I will put you in touch with the Academic Dean.

If you are not qualified or qualified but unable to go, would you please assist by forwarding the link to this post to colleagues who may be able to teach.

For First Time Readers of TWB or a Refresher
A general introduction to Theologians Without Borders is offered in several languages at these links:
Theologians Without Borders
Teólogos Sin Fronteras
Théologiens Sans Frontières
Theologen Ohne Grenzen
Ahli Teologi Tanpa Sempadan
Ang mga Dalubhasa sa Salita ng Diyos na Walang Hangganan
Teólogos Sem Fronteiras
Teologi Senza Frontiere

If you can translate this statement into your language I would be keen to add it to this list.

Interested in Serving With TWB?
A good place to start (without making a commitment) is to adapt this Expression of Interest and send your information with a digital photo to me.

Dr Geoff Pound

Coordinator, Theologians Without Borders

Contact me on email at geoffpound[@]gmail.com or on Facebook or Twitter.

Image: “If you could teach a course in Hermeneutics…”

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Trainer in Community Development and Mission

A local mission organisation in Indonesia, involved in community development projects such as goat husbandry, organic farms and education, is asking for help.

Some projects they are conducting include a village clinic, a Musi floating clinic, a clean water project, compost making, an integrated organic farm, goat breeding and vocational training.

Trainer Requested
They are keen to conduct a special outreach with a people group (10,000) in a remote area and they are asking for the help of a trainer.

Training Subjects
There is flexibility with regard to the timing as this project is still in the developmental phase.

The organizer would like someone to come who has had some experience in community empowerment schemes and a person who can talk with local church people about community development as a gift in itself and as an expression of the gospel and the mission of the church.

Broadcasting
Please pass this message to people who could be involved in fulfilling this request. I can share more details and connect you with a representative from this Indonesian organization.

For First Time Readers or a Refresher
A general introduction to Theologians Without Borders is offered in several languages at these links:
Theologians Without Borders
Teólogos Sin Fronteras
Théologiens Sans Frontières
Theologen Ohne Grenzen
Ahli Teologi Tanpa Sempadan
Ang mga Dalubhasa sa Salita ng Diyos na Walang Hangganan
Teólogos Sem Fronteiras
Teologi Senza Frontiere

If you can translate this statement into your language I would be keen to add it to this list.

Interested in Serving With TWB?
A good place to start (without making a commitment) is to adapt this Expression of Interest and send your information with a digital photo to me.

Dr Geoff Pound
Coordinator, Theologians Without Borders

Contact me on email at geoffpound[@]gmail.com or on Facebook or Twitter.

Image: Goat breeding.

Monday, August 10, 2009

Standing in the Need of Prayer

I have received a letter from the President of a Seminary in Myanmar where his family and the student community are standing in the need of prayer.

He says:
“I'm sure that you have heard about the serious health problems in Myanmar, especially the 'Swine flu'. In my town the situation is rather serious.”

Family
“Our family is also facing the same problem and my younger son has been down with diarrhea and vomiting and had to be admitted to hospital. The medical expenses cost us about US $200 which we had to borrow. Please pray for us so that I may be able to repay the borrowed amounts.”

Student Community
“We have about 51 students this year in our seminary and about 10 of them have been ill in turns. As they can't afford the proper medical treatment and so can't I, we have to do with simple cheap treatments since the financial situation of the students is very poor and we ourselves can't afford to help them. The students are very down hearted. We earnestly pray for a ‘students’ security fund’ of about US$500, from which the students can loan and repay back when facing medical difficulties due to ill health. This fund will be for the long run. Please pray that we may succeed in obtaining this fund for the students.”

“Please continue to pray for our students so that they may recover soon and join the classes.”

For First Time Readers of TWB or a Refresher
A general introduction to Theologians Without Borders is offered in several languages at these links:
Theologians Without Borders
Teólogos Sin Fronteras
Théologiens Sans Frontières
Theologen Ohne Grenzen
Ahli Teologi Tanpa Sempadan
Ang mga Dalubhasa sa Salita ng Diyos na Walang Hangganan
Teólogos Sem Fronteiras
Teologi Senza Frontiere

If you can translate this statement into your language I would be keen to add it to this list.

Interested in Serving With TWB?
A good place to start (without making a commitment) is to adapt this Expression of Interest and send your information with a digital photo to me.

Dr Geoff Pound
Coordinator, Theologians Without Borders
Contact me on email at geoffpound[@]gmail.com or on Facebook or Twitter.

Image: “Please continue to pray for our students…”

Sunday, August 9, 2009

Are You Trained to Enthuse People About Empowerment?

Papua Possibility
Here’s something different.

Harry is from Jakarta, involved with Indonesian Baptists, trained in Management Information and employed by Media Investment in Papua. He writes on a web site called Invest Papua.

Request
Harry asks for the assistance of a person or small team that might help in teaching, training, encouraging people in empowerment, fostering their enthusiasm to establish agricultural and craft projects that might give people dignity, help them to become self-sufficient and assist others.

If you have time and the gifts, there would also be opportunities for leadership training and classes in the seminary.

Itinerary
This depends on your time available and having the money to travel but it could involve time in the capital city (Jayapura) and then in one or two remote areas (highland, island or beach).

Suggested Time
The first suggested time is somewhere after Eid al Fitr (Muslim holiday) 21 September until December 2009. But if you need greater time to plan and arrange for your visit that’s fine.

Do let me know if you would like more information.

Other Opportunities through TWB
Do keep a close watch on this site for requests for help and let other suitable qualified people know of the opportunities of service.

For First Time Readers of TWB or a Refresher
A general introduction to Theologians Without Borders is offered in several languages at these links:
Theologians Without Borders
Teólogos Sin Fronteras
Théologiens Sans Frontières
Theologen Ohne Grenzen
Ahli Teologi Tanpa Sempadan
Ang mga Dalubhasa sa Salita ng Diyos na Walang Hangganan
Teólogos Sem Fronteiras
Teologi Senza Frontiere

If you can translate this statement into your language I would be keen to add it to this list.

Interested in Serving With TWB?
A good place to start (without making a commitment) is to adapt this Expression of Interest and send your information with a digital photo to me.

Dr Geoff Pound
Coordinator, Theologians Without Borders

Contact me on email at geoffpound[@]gmail.com or on Facebook or Twitter.

Image: Glimpses of Papua (province of Indonesia), formerly Dutch New Guinea, West Irian and Irian Jaya.

Saturday, August 8, 2009

Teacher of Christian Education Offering Expertise

An American-based educator in Christian Education is offering to teach for a week or so in an overseas seminary.

This teacher is currently teaching in an American seminary and with international experience, is used to tailoring topics to fit the local context.

Some of the subjects could be drawn from these courses:

1. Introduction To Christian Education
2. Technology In Christian Education
3. The Teacher as a Facilitator of Learning
4. Philosophy of Christian Education
5. Church Administration

Do let me know if you would like more information or there is a possibility of you wanting to host this person in your seminary.

Other Opportunities
Do keep a close watch on this site for requests for help and let other suitable qualified people know of the opportunities of service.

For First Time Readers of TWB or a Refresher
A general introduction to Theologians Without Borders is offered in several languages at these links:
Theologians Without Borders
Teólogos Sin Fronteras
Théologiens Sans Frontières
Theologen Ohne Grenzen
Ahli Teologi Tanpa Sempadan
Ang mga Dalubhasa sa Salita ng Diyos na Walang Hangganan
Teólogos Sem Fronteiras
Teologi Senza Frontiere

If you can translate this statement into your language I would be keen to add it to this list.

Interested in Serving With TWB?
A good place to start (without making a commitment) is to adapt this Expression of Interest and send your information with a digital photo to me.

Dr Geoff Pound
Coordinator, Theologians Without Borders
Contact me on email at geoffpound[@]gmail.com or on Facebook or Twitter.

Image: “The Teacher as a Facilitator of Learning.”

Church Leadership Training in Orissa, India


View Larger Map
A request has come for someone to offer training to church leaders in the Indian state of Orissa.

Topics
Specifically the training requested is in these areas:
* Mission-Understanding and doing the mission of God
* Establishing new churches
* Understanding and enhancing Christian Worship
* Pastoral Care

Timing
There is great flexibility but a suggested window is sometime between 15 November -20 December 2009 (during which time the weather is cooler than usual).

The idea suggested is for an intensive time of training over five days.

If the teacher can stay longer there could be other opportunities arranged in churches prior to or after the training intensive.

Location
This is a training opportunity for a number of people drawn from several churches rather than being seminary based.

It will take place in a residential guest house which has good facilities including AC.

Do let me know if you would like more information or there is a possibility of you being able to serve in this way.

If you cannot serve at this time please pass on this request to others who might be able to serve.

For First Time Readers of TWB or a Refresher
A general introduction to Theologians Without Borders is offered in several languages at these links:
Theologians Without Borders
Teólogos Sin Fronteras
Théologiens Sans Frontières
Theologen Ohne Grenzen
Ahli Teologi Tanpa Sempadan
Ang mga Dalubhasa sa Salita ng Diyos na Walang Hangganan
Teólogos Sem Fronteiras
Teologi Senza Frontiere

If you can translate this statement into your language I would be keen to add it to this list.

Interested in Serving With TWB?
A good place to start (without making a commitment) is to adapt this Expression of Interest and send your information with a digital photo to me.

Dr Geoff Pound
Coordinator, Theologians Without Borders

Contact me on email at geoffpound[@]gmail.com or on Facebook or Twitter.

Image: Google Map of Orissa, India.

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

Short Assignment in PNG for TEE Trained Person

A Bible School in Papua New Guinea is looking for someone to write a Theological Education by Extension (TEE) course on “Wisdom Writing” which comprises Jobs, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs. This is the third part of Old Testament surveys. Here are some of the details I have received:

The person will be required between September 28th- October 19th. However there are often delays when it comes to issuing visas so if the visa is late, the person can still be around before November 15th.

The type of person they need is someone who is a good teacher, can write courses quickly, be focused on what they do and is familiar with editing, illustrations and publications.

Whoever is willing to come must be someone who has experience in TEE course writing or Distance Education materials production.

If there is some time this Bible teacher could also help us with training the staff on the basics of formatting, writing up some Tutor guides and helping the staff with data base or basics of computing.

If there is no course writer, they might need an artist to draw pictures for some of the courses.

If there is no course writer and artist we can get someone who can write TEE assignments and put in reflection sections for a course on the New Testament which is already in the computer.

If you have an interest in exploring this possibility do write to me for more details or to make a connection with the contact person.

For First Time Readers of TWB or as a Refresher
A general introduction to Theologians Without Borders is offered in several languages at these links:
Theologians Without Borders
Teólogos Sin Fronteras
Théologiens Sans Frontières
Theologen Ohne Grenzen
Ahli Teologi Tanpa Sempadan
Ang mga Dalubhasa sa Salita ng Diyos na Walang Hangganan
Teólogos Sem Fronteiras
Teologi Senza Frontiere

If you can translate this statement into your language I would be keen to add it to this list.

Interested in Serving With TWB?
A good place to start (without making a commitment) is to adapt this Expression of Interest and send your information with a digital photo to me.

Dr Geoff Pound
Coordinator, Theologians Without Borders
Contact me on email at geoffpound[@]gmail.com or on Facebook or Twitter.

Image: PNG.