Sunday, May 24, 2009

Theology on the Web

Problem
One of the struggles facing many seminaries, Bible Colleges and students around the world is getting the money to acquire good study material.

Part of the Answer
Rob Bradshaw, is seeking to address this problem.

Rob is a graduate of Bangor University and Mattersey Hall Bible College. He is passionate about Christian theology and church history and about making resources freely available for those who want them.

He is developing web sites with loads of rich resources and is aiming to eventually do this work full-time.

Purposes
The hub of his several web sites states the purposes:

To make high quality theological material available throughout the world, thus providing Bible teachers and pastors with the resources they need to spread the Gospel in their countries. This is achieved by:
1. Providing detailed bibliographies for Seminary level students and ministers.
2. Reprinting, in co-operation with authors and publishers, rare and out-of-print theology books and articles.
3. Providing, with the help of volunteers, translations of theological articles in a number of languages.
4. Providing a single cross-linked resource made up of five websites.

Five Sites:
BiblicalStudies.org.uk provides detailed bibliographies on each book of the Bible, as well as on hermeneutics, archaeology, criticism, language, etc. - in short almost everything connected with the Bible and its study.

TheologicalStudies.org.uk throws its net slightly wider, providing material on a range of theologies and theologians, as well as specific doctrines such as the Trinity, for example. The section on practical theology seeks to provide material on how theology is applied in daily life, in such areas as politics and ethics.

EarlyChurch.org.uk which will cover early church history until the the rise of the medieval Papacy (c.600 AD).

MedievalChurch.org.uk covers church history from the rise of the Papacy to the time of the Reformation.

Missiology.org.uk provides resources for students of Christian missions from the first Century onwards.

Cross-linking of subjects mean that a student studying baptism (for example) would be able to move from the baptism of Jesus, to baptism in the early church, the medieval church and then to how it is understood by a range of modern theologians.


Check out these sites, explore the wealth and get in touch with Rob.

Dr Geoff Pound